Category: futures

How to Invest in Gold

Buyers and institutional investors generally buy Precious Metals from big banks.
London is the hub of the global spot gold market, with more than $26 billion in trades passing through the city’s clearing system each day. To avoid cost and security risks, bullion is not usually physically moved and deals are cleared through paper transfers.
Other significant markets for physical gold are India, China, the Middle East, Singapore, Turkey, Italy, and the United States.
Following are key facts about the market and different ways to invest in precious metal.
SPOT MARKET
FUTURES MARKETS
EXCHANGE-TRADED FUNDS
BARS AND COINS

Hedging Silver

Silver – like gold – has enjoyed a high-octane surge. But what now? How do you keep chasing the profits that inflation is sure to bring without risking the loss of those profits should silver prices reverse? Well, options expert Larry D. Spears last week showed investors how to hedge against a possible decline in the price of gold – and this week he’s back to do the same ….

Why you should Buy Rice Futures

The world is finally waking up to the fact that global grain prices are destined to head higher – much higher.

Nasty weather in key agricultural markets around the world has savaged the global grain crop, meaning worldwide supplies can’t help but be squeezed. Australia, for instance, is experiencing additional flooding in areas that were already battered by the torrential rains of November, December and January.

And as if the supply-related increase in agricultural commodities wasn’t enough, there’s also the U.S. dollar – and the so-called “race to the bottom” – to contend with. Make no mistake: The endless devaluations in the greenback are having a worldwide impact on agricultural commodity prices. Since commodities are priced in dollars, these devaluations translate into higher prices for grains and other food-related commodities.

Short supplies and rising prices are bad enough, but concerns about these first two realities are creating an additional catalyst that completes a trifecta for higher agricultural commodity prices.

And that third catalyst is panic buying – especially with rice, which is a basic table staple in Asian markets. For instance, The Saudi Gazette last week reported that Bangladesh recently tripled its rice-import target and Indonesia just purchased 820,000 tons of Thai rice, nearly five times the volume initially sought.

“This is only the start of the panic buying,” Ker Chung Yang, a commodities analyst at Singapore-based Phillip Futures, said in The Gazette report. “I expect we’ll have more countries coming in and buying grain.”

For global investors, there are five reasons why it’s definitely time to buy rice futures.